We want peaceful elections

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

As we go to polls tomorrow, we have started hearing and seeing some odd happening of political tension in the country.

The attack and subsequent injuries inflicted on some party supporters by others in town on Thursday is a case in point, which has led into six supporters of APRC and the United Democratic Party (UDP) helping the police in their investigations.

Such unfortunate situations that could lead to anything damaging the peace and tranquillity of our society must be stopped.

Our peace should not be allowed to slip from us due to elections that can come and go, and would leave our close-knit society on the path to ever increasing civilization, growth and development.

All of us should therefore endeavour to guard against whatever would bring us chaos, deep-seated hatred and retrogression.

We the people, the Independent Electoral Commission and the security forces should always be ready to jealously guard the peace of our nation and ensure love, truth, and justice guide our actions among ourselves and between us and others.

Peace, in some form, is to exercise restraint where and when we are wronged or offended. It is also permitted by having the ability to forgive. But above all, it is ensured and seriously promoted by justice and fairness.

So the police, the arbiter and the interpreter of the law as well as the general public must always uphold justice and fairness as our bosom friend.

We would therefore like to reiterate, as we go to polls, that the integrity of the electoral commission is at stake if it fails to ensure a level-playing field for all to partake well, to pave the way for a free and fair or corruption-free electoral process, which includes the campaigning and the actual voting.

A free and fair election, we also note, depends on freedom of speech, assembly, association and movement to ensure all members of the electorate in the society participate in elections as enshrined in sections 25 and 26 of our Constitution.

Free and fair elections depends on a transparent electoral process, impartial electoral commission, equitable electoral legislation, equal opportunities for all participants, absence of intimidation, application of the proper procedures, and acceptance of electoral results.

This, we believe, should be the order of the day as we proceed towards the polling day for the current parliamentary electoral process.

Meanwhile, we want peace to prevail as the campaign hits up to climax. The police, the IEC and the people must be alert and ready to nip any violence of a sort in the bud.

“Peace, in some form, is exercise of restraint where and when we are wronged or offended.”

The Point